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Voices’ Blog

General Assembly 2022: Child Welfare Wrap-Up

Posted:  -  By: Allison Gilbreath

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The Foster Care system has been adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. In the last two years foster families have experienced greater financial stress, fewer foster parents have become trained, and turn over in the workforce has increased from already high levels. In some localities children have been sleeping in local department of social services offices while awaiting placement, resulting in the Governor calling a for a special ‚ÄúSafe and Sound‚ÄĚ taskforce to address the urgent needs.

We are encouraged by the final budget including many of the initial priorities for foster care that Governor Northam introduced in December. Beyond those policies, several new programs were funded targeting older youth in care  about to transition to adulthood. Ultimately, we still have a long way to go to properly fund our child welfare system.

Here are the highlights of the budget for child welfare advocates:

Investing in the Infrastructure of Child Welfare

The instability of the foster care workforce and outdated technology are major challenges in Virginia’s child welfare system. According to a 2018 JLARC report, the quit rate for an entry-level Family Services Worker Specialist is 42%, with retention being an even greater issue in small, rural agencies.

  • 10% increase in staff and operations and Local Departments of Social Services over two years
  • $22 million for the replacement of the outdated child welfare data tracking system. Updated technology, along with updated training and child welfare courses, will allow social services to serve children and families more efficiently. This can reduce the length of time between a child entering foster care and finding permanent care through reunification, kinship care, or adoption.
  • $5 Million in mandated reinvestments to provide additional resources for ongoing mandated activities such as post adoption case management services, mutual family assessments, foster care and adoption services, and substance abuse services.

Scale Up Evidence & Community-Based Practices to Achieve Better Outcomes for Children and Families

  • Funding to provide fidelity monitoring and evaluation of evidence‚Äźbased prevention services, appropriates federal Transition Act funding and fully funds salaries for allocated program position.

Provide Social Supports & Easier Path for Kinship Caregivers

  • Funding for SB 396 provides that the court has the authority to review a foster care plan placement determination by a local board of social services
  • Funding for HB 653 Delegate Wampler which directs the Department of Social Services to establish and implement a collaborative local board placement program to increase kinship placements and the number of locally approved foster homes.
  • Increase to TANF Cash Assistance Allocation (impacts Kinship Families receiving child-only TANF) – 5% increase.

Help Foster Care Youth Have Normal Adolescent Experiences

Virginia continues to rank 49th in the country for youth in foster care aging out without a permanent connection. Investments in this area are desperately needed to support transition age youth.

  • Funding for the development of the iFoster Care Portal, a free internet resource that includes education assistance and workforce development options, as well as independent living resources geared for young adults who have experienced foster care.
  • $1 Million to develop a state-funded grant program providing a range of funding for the Great Expectations Program in the following areas: the hiring of college coaches or mentors, housing stipends, child care, and transportation needs.
  • Budget language directing the State Higher Education Council to examine the feasibility of having a point of contact at each public institution of higher education for students who have been involved in the foster care system.

Supporting the Efforts of the Safe and Sound Taskforce

After the budget was reconciled, Governor Youngkin introduced these budget amendments  recommended by the Safe and Sound Task Force which will continue to meet to address the current crisis in placement and the systems level changes needed to prevent children from entering foster care.

  • $592,120¬†for five positions to support the development of collaborative partnerships between local departments of social services (DSS) to increase capacity to approve kinship caregivers and recruit, train, and develop locally approved foster parents. This effort will support¬†HB653,¬†patroned by Del. Wampler, to facilitate collaboration between local DSS.
  • $1.1 million¬†to create an enhanced treatment foster care pilot program, commonly known as the¬†Professional Foster Parent Model. This program will serve foster homes caring for high acuity children and provide participating foster families with an annual stipend of up to $45,000 per youth.
  • $200,000¬†to cover the costs of coordination, recruitment, and additional training to foster care agencies.
  • $3,000,000¬†to support the initiatives of the Safe and Sound Task Force including community-based treatments, support for kinship, foster and adoptive families, and trauma-informed care for children in foster care who are displaced or who are at risk of being displaced.
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