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Our Stories

We believe personal stories illustrate how and why individuals connect to Voices for Virginia’s Children. By explaining in people’s own words why our work matters to them, these stories put a human face to our work. If you would like to share how you have connected to Voices and why you care about our work, please contact Cassie Price.


Buckey Boone, Advocating for Kids in Southwest Virginia

Buckey Boone, pictured here with his grandson, is a lifelong child advocate. When it comes to crafting public policies, William “Buckey” Boone cautions against one-size-fits-all thinking. The long-time resident of…

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Jamie Clancey Works for Trauma-Informed Policies and Practices

Many Americans think of public policy as an abstract concept with little relevance to their daily lives. Not so Jamie Clancey. She sees the effects of public policy everywhere in…

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Keith Hare, Working across the Aisle

The 24-hour news cycle bombards us with stories of political gridlock caused by warring Democrats and Republicans. Less likely to make headlines are examples of good governance, which happens when…

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Latasha Wiggins, CHIP Champion

Latasha Wiggins was standing in a parking lot alternately crying and talking into her phone to a woman in an office of one of Latasha’s elected representatives. It was two…

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Chloe Edwards, Kinship Care Advocate

Photograph: Chloe Edwards, left, pictured with her grandparents and Richmond mayor Levar Stoney. “You think you’re pretty, but you’re really not. You think you’re smart, but you’re really not. You’ll…

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Susan Fincke, Using Data to Educate and Persuade

Susan Fincke uses data to educate and persuade. The executive director of Friends of the Portsmouth Juvenile Court, a nonprofit dedicated to creating better futures for Portsmouth’s court-involved youth and…

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Lee Switz understands fundraising, advocacy connection

Voices board member Lee Switz traces her involvement with social justice to 1964 when she boarded a bus bound for Washington, D.C. A recent 21-year-old college graduate, Lee went to…

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